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Tag: research

8
Oct

Breaking Down Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias

TACs are characterized by attacks of pain on one side of the head along with autonomic symptoms on the same side, such as a tearing, red eye, stuffy or runny nose, and facial sweating.

3
Sep

How Concussion and PTSD May Complicate Migraine Disease

Migraine disease can be challenging to treat, but it may be even more complicated for patients who have also dealt with concussions and/or PTSD. Current evidence suggests that having one of those conditions puts a patient at risk for more complicated, intractable symptoms for the other conditions.

31
Jul

Cluster Headache Patients Face An Uphill Battle for High-Flow Oxygen

There are numerous barriers preventing cluster headache patients from getting a timely and correct diagnosis, let alone accessing the most effective treatment—high-flow oxygen therapy.

27
Mar

Why Are Cluster Headaches Affected by the Seasons?

Why cluster headaches are linked to seasonal changes is likely due to the length of the days. How much sunlight there is in a day changes as the seasons shift, making nights shorter and days longer or vice versa.

28
Feb

Why Do We Hate Light? Perhaps the Answer is More Complicated Than We Thought

Why are we as a community of people with migraine so averse to light? At least 40% of us have photophobia to some extent, but none of us really understand it.

26
Nov

New Migraine Treatments: What’s in the Pipeline

2018 may have been a pivotal year in migraine treatment with the release of CGRP monoclonal antibodies, but that was merely the first wave of new treatments for people with migraine disease. As 2019 winds down, there are more promising treatments in the pipeline than ever before, all aiming at different targets in the migraine process. Some are new kinds of medications that may abort or prevent attacks with fewer risks than other currently available treatments. Others are neuromodulators, devices that patients can apply externally to disrupt the electrical signals during migraine attacks. 

8
Nov

Invalidated, Invisible, Inspired

It wasn’t like I had a brain tumor. This is what I remember most from my first trip to the student health center the first semester of my freshman year.  The doctor loudly exclaiming outside my small sterile examining room that “it wasn’t like [I] had a brain tumor.”

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