Meet Our Authors

With various backgrounds and experiences, we are exploring the spectrum of migraine through the perspectives of these guest authors. Learn more about the people who are providing you with their personal experiences and the latest information in migraine.

Alene Brennan

Alene Brennan

"I turned my pain into my passion! I became a certified nutrition coach to support individuals living with migraines and autoimmune disease use diet, lifestyle and essential oils to best manage their health. I work with individuals around the world via phone and video chat and it’s been the most rewarding experience. To be able to help another person with migraine experience relief and get back to living their life is everything to me. "

Danielle Fancher

Danielle Fancher

"I’ve been suffering from migraine since the age of 16. I’ve experienced chronic migraine for the past ten years. And on 10/2/2013, a migraine started that never stopped. In result. I’ve been battling constant pain ever since. This means that I haven’t had break (not even for a minute) in over five years."

Ashley Hattle

Ashley Hattle

"I’ve had episodic cluster headaches (ECH) since 2007. My first attack happened on the stand as a lifeguard which was my summer job and I thought it was dehydration, but it came back at the same time every day for two weeks. Weirdly, a year before that I had similar “attacks” that only lasted 10-20 seconds, which was SUNCT, another form of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. My cycles were two weeks every six months for several years. Despite getting a correct diagnosis right away, every doctor and nurse I saw after that told me I had to have migraines because I’m a woman."

Stacy Herman

Stacey Herman

"Everyone’s experience is different. What works for me may not work for you and vice versa but that’s why I am always willing to try everything because it’s worth if it does. There is not one simple solution to migraine. You have to attack it from all sides. Also remember, even if you’re in a really bad spot right now, I’ve found from living with migraine as long as I have that there are up and down periods to your pain longterm. So if you are in a down period right now it does eventually get better. Don’t give up. There is more awareness now for migraine than ever before and that is something to get excited about."

Lisa Smith

Lisa Smith

"I was diagnosed with migraine disease in 2005 after a midnight ambulance trip to the local ER for pain so severe I thought I must be having a stroke. But in hindsight, I think I may have had symptoms in childhood. It just took until I turned 40 for symptoms to grow severe and consistent enough for a clear diagnosis."

Michelle Tracy

Michelle Tracy

“I’m lucky to have Dr. Kate Atkinson, an amazing primary care physician who has never given up on me, even as many neurologists did. And I’m lucky to live close to the Boston area, where there is a cluster of great health care providers with specialties in chronic migraine and other headache disorders,” she says. Even so, Michelle says it took 11 years before she finally found a specialist who helped her find some relief.

Lindsay Weitzel

Lindsay Weitzel

"My whole life I was frustrated by the fact that no one in medicine could help me. I developed chronic daily migraine as a toddler and complex regional pain syndrome not many years later, yet my doctors thought I had sinus headaches until I was seventeen. Each time I asked what was wrong or why I was in so much pain (why my bones were burning, why I was dizzy, etc.), I felt I was met with the infamous “they”. “They don’t know why”, “they don’t have medicines for these things” was everyone’s answer to me as a child. I knew early-on I wanted to be a part of this nebulous group known as “they”, since as far as I could tell, this was the group of people who could make a difference."

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Selena Wilson

"I am also one of the approximately 25% of migraineurs in America who suffer from chronic migraine, defined as 15 or more days of migraine symptoms/pain per month; at best, it’s like taking half a month and throwing it in the trash, and for me the symptomatic days number significantly higher–24/7, 365. The intensity fluctuates, but the symptoms never go away."